Take me out to the ballgame!

Sarah Thomas
Sarah Thomas Physical Therapist at AHS

The Nationals are playing better than ever before this season. Go Nats!!! With that in mind, we thought it would be helpful to talk about some common baseball related injuries. 

A vital member of the team of course is the pitcher. With the repeated throwing movement required to pitch a ball, Pitchers are susceptible to shoulder injuries. One common overuse injury a pitcher may experience is called GIRD (Glenohumeral Internal Rotation Dysfunction).

What is it?

With GIRD, the repetitive overhead motion is thought to cause tightening of the posterior capsule (muscles on the backside of the shoulder). This affects the position of the humeral head (the top of the upper arm bone that makes up part of the shoulder) causing the humeral head to move in the opposite direction of the tight capsule. It moves the humeral head forward and upward when the arm is flexed forward. It also causes posteriorsuperior translation (moves back and raises) of the humeral head during abduction and external rotation. When this happens internal rotation is limited and the motion of throwing can become very painful.

Treatment

Treatment involves rest from throwing and pitching for up to 6 months and physical therapy. Therapy will involve a lot of stretching of the posteroinferior capsule. This will include the sleeper stretch, roll over sleeper stretch, doorway stretch, cross-over arm adduction stretch and pec minor stretching. Therapy will also work on rotator cuff and periscapular strengthening. 90% of cases can be resolved non-operatively with physical therapy.

How can AHS help?

Here at Allied Health Solutions we will create an exercise routine and stretches to your specific deficits and give you the tools you need to improve on your own time. We will use hands on therapy techniques to reduce pain and help you return to the activities that are most important to you.

References:

https://www.orthobullets.com/shoulder-and-elbow/3055/glenohumeral-internal-rotation-deficit-gird

 

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